AIS Corner

AIS Education

AIS: Lateral Hip Stretch

Over the past 2 newsletters, we have been looking at the hips/pelvic girdle and some of the primary muscles and how to stretch them. We will now be looking at several muscles on the outside of the hip (lateral side of the femur). Some of these soft-tissue attachments travel from the hip and crosses the knee. One specifically we will be focusing on is a long tendinis like structure (fascial tissue) called the IT band. In order to stretch this tendon, the leg you are stretching must have a locked knee and the movement must come from the hip.  [···]

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Active Isolated Stretching: Shoulder adduction and abduction

Active Isolated Stretching works with 3 basic principles

  • Contract the apposing muscle to send a signal to let go to the muscle you want to stretch
  • In order to increase the stretch apply light pressure at the end of range of motion and hold for 2 seconds
  • Allow the muscle to relax into a neutral position after each repetition

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Active Isolated Stretching: Pectoralis Major Stretch

Active Isolated Stretching works with 3 basic principles

  • Contract the apposing muscle to send a signal to let go to the muscle you want to stretch
  • In order to increase the stretch apply light pressure at the end of range of motion and hold for 2 seconds
  • Allow the muscle to relax into a neutral position after each repetition

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Active Isolated Stretching: wrist adduction and abduction

Active Isolated Stretching works with 3 basic principles

  • Contract the apposing muscle to send a signal to let go to the muscle you want to stretch
  • In order to increase the stretch apply light pressure at the end of range of motion and hold for 2 seconds
  • Allow the muscle to relax into a neutral position after each repetition

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Active Isolated Stretching: Hands and Fingers

In following the theme with arm care we can’t ignore the hands and fingers. There is very little we do without the closure of our hands from opening a door, picking up a bag to any eye hand coordination sport. When joints stop moving they can no longer function which leads to instability and muscle weakness.   [···]

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